Good News From NATRC

This is a reprint of a blog post created by EasyCare’s Director of Marketing, 5eec1d573137b43b146df2ac795ed42f_w640Kevin Myers, on Tuesday, November 16, 2010 by Kevin Myers. You can see the original post here.

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The National Board of Directors of the North American Trail Ride Conference (NATRC) met last weekend in Denver. One of the rule changes on the agenda was the Hoof Boot Sole Protection rule.

The changes to the rule to allow “gaiter, keepers and straps” were passed. The exact wording is below.

Page 5-2 Section 5.E. Reads:
Shoeing
1.    There are no shoeing restrictions.

Change to: 5.E. Hoof Protection
1.    There are no shoeing restrictions.
2.    All types of hoof boots that provide sole protection are allowed. However, any attached strap, keeper, or gaiter must not extend above the pastern. The judges may request to observe the area covered by the attached strap, keeper, or gaiter.

Page 5-2 Section 5.F.4. Reads:
Protective devices on the legs of the horse are not allowed. The leg is defined as all structures above and including the coronary band.

Change to: Protective devices, such as bell boots or wraps, are not permissible on the legs of horses except for hoof sole protections as allowed under Section 5.E.2. The leg is defined as all structures above and including the coronet band.

Page 6-2 Section 6.B.2. Reads:
Soundness 45%: The evaluation of soundness shall include, but not be limited to, the following: lameness, cinch sores, rubs, splints, ringbone, spavin, sidebone, etc.

Change by adding: The evaluation of soundness shall include, but not be limited to, the following: lameness, cinch sores, rubs (including areas covered by any attached strap, keeper, or gaiter), splints, ringbone, spavin, sidebone, etc.

Page 6-2 Section 6.C.1.c. Reads:
Tack and Equipment: The evaluation of tack and equipment, proper fit, adjustment, repair; trail gear placement and security.

Change by adding: The evaluation of tack and equipment, proper fit, adjustment, repair; adjustment, proper fit of any attached strap, keeper, or gaiter; trail gear placement and security.

Purpose: from the Judges Committee: the new boot designs have given riders much more of a choice in how they would like to compete.  This will also encourage and remind judges to check for rubs, fit, etc.

How will these rule changes affect you and your horse?

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Winter Riding and Keeping Your Legs Warm

Recently, on our Facebook page, a question was asked about riding in the windpro_bootwinter.

Christine: If you’re used to riding in jeans and want to give riding breeches a try, is there a way to use breeches in the winter to stay warm?

Responses:

Angie: Depends on where you live Christine. If it’s not too cold, like under 30 degree’s, I’d wear the Irideon Wind Pro 3 Seasons but if it’s under 30, I’d go for the Kerrits Sit Tight and Warm. Tropical Riders Toasties are nice too, but not sold at ART ;)

BTW – Tropical Riders Toasties can be found and purchased at http://tropicalrider.com/home.asp. Also, the Kerrits Sit Tight N’ Warm is also available with a knee patch.

Candy: Hi Christine – Riding in winter can be hard because it is so cold but Irideon and Kerrit’s have solved that problem with some wonderful winter riding wear. Kerrit introduced the new RideOutSide pant and jacket this season and Irideon has the ever wonderful Windpro pant and jacket. This riding wear is both windproof and rainproof. Both Kerrits and Irideon also offer wonderful polarfleece pants that are cozy and comfortable. Here is the link for the riding pants to see these options: http://www.actionridertack.com/c-10-rider-apparel-gear.aspx

While on the website, feel free to check out our other winter riding wear – sweaters, coats, etc.

Have fun. For me it is difficult to get out there but once up on my horse it’s heaven no matter the temperature.

Do you have any suggestions for gearing up to ride in the winter weather?

 

Mount Your Horse From the Left?

Remember back to when you first learned to ride. Were you taught to mount from the left? Do you know why?

Mounting a horse from the left is a long-standing tradition rooted in our history of war and the use of horses in combat. Mounted soldiers would wear swords on their left side, so in order to protect their horses’ backs, they would mount from the left.

Did you know that? I just learned it myself! But we’re not going to war, we’re trail riding!

Now, if you’ve been trail riding for a while, you’ve no doubt come across obstacles where you have had to get off of your horse and perhaps come into a situation where mounting your horse from the left was not an attractive option (especially when there’s a cliff, mud, brush or other hazard preventing you).

In addition to allowing your horse to be more accommodating to your mounting from the opposite side, alternating sides also enhances your horse’s ability to build muscle more equally across his/her spine.

If you have not ever mounted your horse from the right, getting you and your horse used to the idea before finding yourself in an awkward situation would be beneficial to both of you. Think about it…if you’re right handed, have you ever tried to brush your teeth with your left? Of course, it’s possible, but it’s awkward, not nearly as effective and I usually end up with toothpaste on my hand (looking more like a rabid dog than a person brushing their teeth).

So, start making it a habit of switching sides when mounting. You’ll both be happier when you have to mount near a trail hazard and it won’t matter which side it’s on!

Do you have any stories you could share about mounting adventures?

Courtesy of The Winged Pony of Wisdom